The future of the web, isn’t the web

by @edent | # # # # | 9 comments | Read ~5,063 times.
A fist emerges from a computer screen and punches the user.

My friends, and former employers, at the Government Digital Service have written a spectacularly good blog post “Making GOV.UK more than a website“. In it, they describe how adding Schema.org markup to their website has allowed search engines to extract semantic content and display it to a user. For example, the “Learn to drive” page…

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Add review to Goodreads from Schema markup

by @edent | # # # # # #
The Goodreads Logo.

I write book reviews on my blog. I also want to syndicate them to Goodreads. Sadly, Goodreads doesn’t natively read the Schema.org markup I so carefully craft. So here’s the scrap of code I use to syndicate my reviews. Goodreads API Keys Get your Keys from https://www.goodreads.com/api/keys You will also need to get OAuth tokens…

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Convert DOI to a HTML5 / Schema citation

by @edent | # # # # #
The DOI logo.

This is a quick and dirty way to turn a DOI (Digital Object Identifiers for academic papers) into an HTML & Microdata citation. I use this to power my Citations page. Schema.org is a Microdata standard which allows machines to read your HTML and create semantic relations between documents. Here’s a minimum viable citation: <blockquote…

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Use-cases wanted! Adding dietary requirements to Schema.org/Person

by @edent | # # | 6 comments | Read ~155 times.
Vegetarian sashimi on a bed of ice.

I want Schema.org to add dietary requirements to the Person specification. And I need your help! Background Schema.org is a metadata standard. You can include it on webpages to create structured, machine-readable data. Here’s a sample way of representing a Person: { “@context”: “https://schema.org/”, “@type”: “Person”, “name”: “Albert Einstein”, “hasOccupation”: [ { “@type”: “Occupation”, “name”:…

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