Addressing the Overlooked Non-Micropsychiatric Uses for Thiotimoline

By
on · · 2 comments · 700 words
A chair specifically designed to but awkward - it has a bowed seat and leans forward at an uncomfortable angle.

One of the (many) problems with AI is that training data usually needs to come from "natural" sources. If you want to emulate human-written text, you need to train something on human-written text. But with the proliferation of cheap and fast AI tools, it is likely that training data will unwillingly become contaminated with AI-written […]

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LinkedIn supports Schema‎.org metadata

By
on · · 4 comments · 400 words
The LinkedIn logo.

I'm a big fan of machine-readable metadata. It's useful for programs which need to extract information from messy and complicated websites. It's always surprising where it turns up. For example, take this post of mine on LinkedIn. If you view the source, you'll see this scrap of linked data: <script type="application/ld+json"> { "@context": "http://schema.org", "@type": […]

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Does AI mean we don't need the Semantic Web?

By
on · · 4 comments · 350 words · read ~1,995 times.
User: Read the following sentence: "Our opening hours are: Weekdays 10 until 7. Weekend 10 until 10 (Early closing 9 o'clock Sunday)." ChatGPT: The given sentence states the opening hours of a certain establishment. Here is the breakdown of the opening hours mentioned: Weekdays: The establishment is open from 10 in the morning until 7 in the evening. Weekend: On weekends, the establishment is open from 10 in the morning until 10 at night. Early closing on Sunday: On Sundays, the establishment closes earlier than usual, at 9 o'clock in the evening. Please note that this information is based solely on the provided sentence, and the specific establishment or its type is not mentioned. User: Is the establishment open at 2130 on Sunday? ChatGPT: Based on the information provided in the sentence, the establishment has early closing on Sunday, with the closing time set at 9 o'clock in the evening. Therefore, the establishment would not be open at 21:30 (or 9:30 PM) on Sunday.

If you hang around with computerists long enough, they start talking about the Semantic Web. If you can represent human knowledge in a way that's easy for computers to understand it will be transformative for information processing. But computers, traditionally, haven't been very good at parsing ambiguous human text. Suppose you saw this text written […]

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Adding restaurant review metadata to WordPress

By
on · · 4 comments · 350 words
Screenshot of a user interface which allows the entry of data.

I've started adding Restaurant Reviews to this blog - with delicious semantic metadata. Previously I'd been posting all my reviews to HappyCow. It's a great site for finding veggie-friendly food around the worlds, but I wanted to experiment more with the IndieWeb idea of POSSE. So now I can Post on my Own Site and […]

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Semantic Comments for WordPress

By
on · · 2 comments · 750 words · read ~135 times.
The Logo for WordPress

As regular readers will know, I love adding Semantic things to my blog. The standard WordPress comments HTML isn't very semantic - so I thought I'd change that. Here's some code which you can add to your blog's theme - an an explanation of how it works. The aim is to end up with some […]

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How to add ISSN metadata to a web page

By
on · · 5 comments · 450 words · read ~2,365 times.
creenshot of an email from the British Library. Dear Terence Eden INTERNATIONAL STANDARD SERIAL NUMBER (ISSN) Thank you for your recent enquiry, we have assigned ISSN to the following publication(s): Terence Eden’s blog ISSN 2753-1570 .

Inspired by John Hoare at the Dirty Feed blog - I've asked the British Library to assign my blog an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN). An ISSN is an 8-digit code used to identify newspapers, journals, magazines and periodicals of all kinds and on all media–print and electronic. Why? Shut up. OK. It turns out […]

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Introducing DOI2HT.ML - the simple semantic citation server

By
on · · 6 comments · 200 words · read ~313 times.
Website Screenshot.

Academic citations are hard. One of the joys of the Digital Object Identifier System (DOI) is that every academic paper gets a unique reference - like: 10.34053/artivate.8.2.2. As well as always leading you to a URl of the paper, a DOI also provides lots of metadata. Things like author, publisher, ORCID, year of publication etc. […]

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Adding Semantic Reviews / Rich Snippets to your WordPress Site

By
on · · 1,050 words
Screenshot of JSON code in a web page.

This is a real "scratch my own itch" post. I want to add Schema.org semantic metadata to the book reviews I write on my blog. This will enable "rich snippets" in search engines. There are loads of WordPress plugins which do this. But where's the fun in that?! So here's how I quickly built it […]

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The future of the web, isn't the web

By
on · · 11 comments · 700 words · read ~5,283 times.
A fist emerges from a computer screen and punches the user.

My friends, and former employers, at the Government Digital Service have written a spectacularly good blog post "Making GOV.UK more than a website". In it, they describe how adding Schema.org markup to their website has allowed search engines to extract semantic content and display it to a user. For example, the "Learn to drive" page […]

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Add review to Goodreads from Schema markup

By
on · · 550 words
The Goodreads Logo.

I write book reviews on my blog. I also want to syndicate them to Goodreads. Sadly, Goodreads doesn't natively read the Schema.org markup I so carefully craft. So here's the scrap of code I use to syndicate my reviews. Goodreads API Keys Get your Keys from https://www.goodreads.com/api/keys You will also need to get OAuth tokens […]

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