If HTML5 Were British

by @edent | # # # | 6 comments | Read ~322 times.
The HTML5 Logo.

If you’ve been around programming circles long enough, you’ll probably have read the seminal “If PHP Were British“. If not, go read it now. I’ll wait. I love the idea of a non-American programming language. I’m aware that there are some, but I’m unaware of any which are in British English. Except, perhaps, BBC Basic.…

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Localisation is too hard for Gmail

by @edent | # # # # | 10 comments | Read ~7,737 times.
Google email interface.

/ləʊk(ə)lʌɪˈzeɪʃ(ə)n/ The ability to adjust a user-interface to the user’s local language or dialect Because I live in the UK, I speak en_GB (English, Great Britain) rather than en_US (English, Simplified United States). Mostly, all dialects of English are mutually intelligible. Sure, the Brits love the letter U and the Americans stick a Z in…

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<input type=”country” />

by @edent | # # # | 25 comments | Read ~16,356 times.
A screenshot of a list of country flags

Recently, Lea Verou asked an important question about whether HTML should have a standardised way of letting users select a country from a list. HTML Idea: <input type="country"> which would become a searchable dropdown with all countries and their flags.Wouldn't that be awesome? — Lea Verou (@LeaVerou) October 21, 2017 You can read through the…

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Why can't you send email to a Chinese address?

by @edent | # # # # | 4 comments | Read ~4,105 times.

We all know what an email address looks like and how to validate them, right? A few years ago I got the Chinese domain name 莎士比亚.org. You can browse to it, link to it, and send email to it. Or can you? When I tried two years ago, none of the major email providers supported…

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