Book Review: The Gendered Brain by Gina Rippon

by @edent | # # | 1 comment
Gendered Brain Book Cover.

Do you have a female brain or a male brain? Or is that the wrong question? We live in a gendered world where we are bombarded with messages about sex and gender. On a daily basis we face deeply ingrained beliefs that your sex determines your skills and preferences, from toys and colours to career choice and salaries. But what does this constant gendering mean for our thoughts, decisions and behaviour?

Continue reading →

Book Review: Zero Sum Game by S. L. Huang

by @edent | #
A bullet hole in a window.

A blockbuster, near-future science fiction thriller, S.L. Huang's Zero Sum Game introduces a math-genius mercenary who finds herself being manipulated by someone possessing unimaginable power...

Continue reading →

Review: Because Internet by Gretchen McCulloch

by @edent | # #
The book cover.

The internet isn't the first technology to alter how we communicate, but it is making our language change faster and in more interesting ways than ever before. Linguistically inventive niche online communities spread slang and jargon exponentially faster than in the days when new dialects were constrained by physical space. What's more, social media provides a fascinating laboratory for watching language evolve in real time.

Continue reading →

Book Review - The Chemical Detective by Fiona Erskine

by @edent | # #
Book cover, the silhouette of a woman skis away from a helicopter.

Dr Jaq Silver. Skier, scientist, international jet-setter, explosives expert. She blows things up to keep people safe.

Working on avalanche control in Slovenia, Jaq stumbles across a problem with a consignment of explosives. After raising a complaint with the supplier, a multinational chemical company, her evidence disappears and she is framed for murder. Jaq must find the key to the mystery.

But can she uncover the truth before her time runs out?

Continue reading →

Book Review - The Five by Hallie Rubenhold

by @edent | # #
A book cover in the style of a Victorian newpaper headline.

Polly, Annie, Elizabeth, Catherine and Mary-Jane are famous for the same thing, though they never met. They came from Fleet Street, Knightsbridge, Wolverhampton, Sweden and Wales. They wrote ballads, ran coffee houses, lived on country estates, they breathed ink-dust from printing presses and escaped people-traffickers. What they had in common was the year of their murders: 1888.

Continue reading →

Book Review: Secret Commonwealth by Philip Pullman

by @edent | #
A train going over a bridge.

Intrigue is swirling around Lyra once more. Her daemon Pantalaimon is witness to a brutal murder, and the dying man entrusts them with secrets that carry echoes from their past. They learn of a city haunted by daemons, of a desert said to hold the secret of Dust. Powerful forces are about to throw Lyra and Malcolm together once again. And the dangers they face will challenge everything they thought they knew about the world, and about themselves.

Continue reading →

Book Review: Permanent Record

by @edent | # # #
Edward Snowden, a geek in glasses, looks away from the camera.

Edward Snowden, the man who risked everything to expose the US government’s system of mass surveillance, reveals for the first time the story of his life, including how he helped to build that system and what motivated him to try to bring it down.

Continue reading →

Book Review: Helpful Hackers

by @edent | # #
A locked gate.

The Netherlands is a world leader in responsible disclosure. The Dutch like to resolve conflicts through a process of general consultation: the famous ‘polder model’. In this book, we hear from the hackers, system owners, IT specialists, managers, journalists, politicians and lawyers who have been key players in a number of prominent disclosures. Their stories offer a glimpse into the mysterious world of cyber security, revealing how hackers can help us all.

Continue reading →

Book Review: A Single Thread by Tracy Chevalier

by @edent | #
A pair of ornate sewing scissors.

It is 1932, and the losses of the First World War are still keenly felt.

Violet Speedwell, mourning for both her fiancé and her brother and regarded by society as a ‘surplus woman’ unlikely to marry, resolves to escape her suffocating mother and strike out alone.

Continue reading →

Book Review: Queer Privacy - Sarah Jamie Lewis

by @edent | #
A cyberpunk scene.

Queer Privacy is a collection of essays about community, family, coming out, dating, domestic violence, activism, sex work and suicide. We will talk about problems, we won't always have solutions, and not all the stories have happy endings. After all, this is real life and we are building it together - one step at a time.

Continue reading →