Book Review: Shouting Zeros and Ones – Digital Technology, Ethics and Policy in New Zealand – Andrew Chen

by @edent | # # # # # # | 1 comment
A plain book cover.

‘Understanding how the zeros and ones increasingly influence and control our lives is critical to understanding how we can reciprocate influence and control back onto those zeros and ones.’ This vital book is a call to action: to reduce online harm, to protect the integrity of our digital lives and to uphold democratic participation and…

Continue reading →

Book Review: The Thief on the Winged Horse – Kate Mascarenhas

by @edent | # #
A winged horse carved into a tree.

The Kendrick family have been making world-famous dolls for over 200 years. But their dolls aren’t coveted for the craftsmanship alone. Each one has a specific emotion laid on it by its creator. A magic that can make you feel bucolic bliss or consuming paranoia at a single touch. Though founded by sisters, now only…

Continue reading →

Review: Circe by Madeline Miller

by @edent | # #
The golden mask of a Greek Goddess.

In the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe is a strange child – not powerful, like her father, nor viciously alluring like her mother. Turning to the world of mortals for companionship, she discovers that she does possess power – the power of…

Continue reading →

Book Review: Privacy is Power – Carissa Véliz

by @edent | # # # # | 1 comment | Read ~105 times.
Book Cover.

Without your permission, or even your awareness, tech companies are harvesting your location, your likes, your habits, your relationships, your fears, your medical issues, and sharing it amongst themselves, as well as with governments and a multitude of data vultures. They’re not just selling your data. They’re selling the power to influence you and decide…

Continue reading →

Book Review: Utopia Five (Panopticon Book 1) – A.E. Currie

by @edent | # #
Whose world would you kill for?

My name is Lee and I was born on the 8th January 2025 – the day the Panopticon was turned on. In 2053, Earth is a changed place. City states make their own laws and we’re all watched over by the ever present drones. I reckon the new Earth is a utopia. We’re still alive…

Continue reading →

Book Review: Invisible Agents: Women and Espionage in Seventeenth-Century Britain

by @edent | #
Painting of a 17th Century woman. She holds a finger to her lips.

It would be easy for the modern reader to conclude that women had no place in the world of early modern espionage, with a few seventeenth-century women spies identified and then relegated to the footnotes of history. If even the espionage carried out by Susan Hyde, sister of Edward Hyde, Earl of Clarendon, during the…

Continue reading →

Review: Lud-in-the-Mist

by @edent | #
A rainbow over a river.

Lud-in-the-Mist – a prosperous country town situated where two rivers meet: the Dawl and the Dapple. The latter, which has its source in the land of Faerie, is a great trial to Lud, which had long rejected anything ‘other’, preferring to believe only in what is known, what is solid. Nathaniel Chanticleer is a somewhat…

Continue reading →

Book Review: Brit(ish)

by @edent | # # #
Book cover.

You’re British. Your parents are British. Your partner, your children and most of your friends are British. So why do people keep asking where you’re from? We are a nation in denial about our imperial past and the racism that plagues our present. Brit(ish) is Afua Hirsch’s personal and provocative exploration of how this came…

Continue reading →

Book Review: The One That Got Away

by @edent | #
The New Zealand parliament building on a book cover.

Lauren Fraser is easing into a comfortable retirement when her historian friend Ro reveals a shocking secret. Ro’s research has uncovered the attempted poisoning of a New Zealand prime minister. Despite herself, Lauren is drawn into the mystery. Who was the would-be murderer and can they be brought to justice after thirty years? Who has…

Continue reading →

Book Review: A Short Philosophy of Birds

by @edent | # | 3 comments
Drawings of birds.

The greatest wisdom comes from the smallest creatures There is so much we can learn from birds. Through twenty-two little lessons of wisdom inspired by how birds live, this charming French book will help you spread your wings and soar. We often need the help from those smaller than us. Having spent a lifetime watching…

Continue reading →